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Adopt Stormy

Male Adult Blue Lacy/Texas Lacy

If you have questions about Stormy please contact

Weimaraner Rescue of Texas

About Stormy

SPECIAL NEEDS - PLEASE READ BEFORE APPLYING Hey there world, I’m Stormy.  I’m a 3-year-old, 50-pound, Texas Blue Lacey (yes, my foster mom did the DNA test).  Please make sure you read my whole profile though because I need a specific adopter because my past life before rescue was not good. When I first came into rescue in July 2019, I had been in a shelter for 6 months after having been found stray.  No one even named me at the shelter that whole time I was there.  They just told me to go in and out of my run.  When WRT came to take me, I wasn’t sure how to act.  Every time I was in a stressful situation the only way I knew how to soothe myself was to turn in circles and chase my tail and grab my back leg with my teeth.  After arriving in foster care, my foster mom thought there might be something more medically wrong with me because I wasn’t eating right so rescue started looking into possible neurological issues.  She advocated every step of the way for me.  So, we went to a neurologist who put me on seizure medication thinking that I was potentially having pre-seizures.  The medication, however, didn’t help my anxiety or lower my need to self soothe in a crazy way.  All neurological tests that they did came back negative, so we proceeded with trying to determine if the way I was acting was behavioral. That’s when I met my favorite person in the whole world.  Maegan Bardes with The Confident Pooch and my boarding guys, Alex and Ray, with Hudson’s Camp Canine.  Maegan realized that my behavior was severe OCD and she started working with me to help me learn how to be the dog everyone knew I could be.  I stayed and trained with her for 4 months until we thought it was time that I go to a foster home.  Unfortunately, my second foster home had a train that went right by the potty area and that absolutely freaked me out so I went back to stay with Maegan until a new foster could be found.  I have now been with my current foster family for a few months now, so they know pretty much what I need for a forever adoptive family. Must Haves: Patient Owner (Preferably One that Lives Alone) - A patient, gentle, soft-spoken owner, preferably one that lives alone and doesn't have very many visitors.  I need a very calm and quiet environment.  Someone that has a consistent and quiet routine and that has a very calming gentle nature.  This owner must be willing to continue to give me my anxiety medication and reinforce the training I have gotten.  If people do come to visit or someone comes to the door, I need to be crated or put outside away from people as any new introductions escalate my anxiety. Solid Wood Fence - A home with a solid fence and very few cars coming and going for me to see.    You see, you wouldn’t believe how far I’ve come in 6 months.  When kept in a calm predictable environment, I don’t spin to chase my tail or grab my leg, but when I get overly anxious it may come out occasionally.  A dog door will also be needed for me to come and go.  I love to be outside and will lay for hours soaking up the sun outside. No children - Because of my anxiety any extra stimulation gets me worked up so no kids please. Likes: I love my walks and I'm great on leash (even a grandma could walk me).  I am still slightly reactive when cars go by, so if you will have me sit as they go by I do well. I sit, stay, heel, down, and go to my place.  I love to work for treats. I’m housebroken and crate trained - although I'd love to lay beside you if you will let me. I ride in the car without barking now and would like to go for a ride to a walking trail, but out where people might want to pet me will make me anxious. I do fine when left alone.  White noise or calm soothing music is my favorite. I love to catch and drop (if you throw the ball though I will not retrieve it for you). I am fine with other dogs off leash, but this would be more for boarding than for living unless the other dog is older and really laid back and ok with my anxiety.  I'm currently living with a Weimaraner and he plays with me sometimes, but he knows when I don't want to play too. I love praise and cuddling on my own terms and morning coffee time. Dislikes: Passing cars while walking - you have to use my commands to help me remember to stay calm New people - introductions to new people must be slow and in a specific way or I will spin Loud noises - clapping your hands together sends me retreating in fear to the outdoors, slamming doors, banging pans in the kitchen, and especially lawn equipment like blowers, mowers and weed whackers.  Surprisingly though I'm not afraid of the vacuum.  I'll just watch you very closely. Vet visits - since I'm currently up to date on all my vet care I shouldn't need to see a vet for another year.  I've even had a recent dental so that I don't have to be stressed out.  Don't be surprised if the vet needs to muzzle me though because the vet is a very stressful place for me. If you can’t tell, I just need someone as special as me to help keep me calm.  I know that is out there for me to finally get my forever home.  My trainer, Maegan, will work with any adopter that adopts me in the Dallas area.  Please ask about me if you are in Dallas. ##454693##

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Details

Name
Stormy
Age
Adult
Gender
Male
Size
Small
Shots up to date
YES
Ok with kids
Not Sure
Housetrained
YES
Hypoallergenic
Not Sure
Spayed / Neutered
YES
Ok with dogs
YES
Ok with cats
Not Sure
See details

Lucy

Weimaraner

SPECIAL NEEDS: Lucy is a 16-week-old, 23-pound, Gray female Weimaraner that was surrendered to WRT due to neurological deficits at birt... show more

SPECIAL NEEDS: Lucy is a 16-week-old, 23-pound, Gray female Weimaraner that was surrendered to WRT due to neurological deficits at birth along with her brother Ricky.  Her neurological deficits are more defined than her brother's and include a head-tilt, moving in a circular fashion with a bunny-hop and sometimes she falls over. WRT has done extensive neurological testing on them and the vet thinks with the symptoms they have and the clear MRI and spinal tap that it can only be two remaining things: In utero herpes virus:  If this is the cause, then the damage is already done and they will not progress in their condition – they will just be like they are now and live a somewhat normal life with their symptoms.  This condition often produces stillborn puppies so he is leaning more to this one since there were other littermates that were stillborn.  Cerebellar abiotrophy:  This condition is an autosomal genetic recessive gene and can only be definitively tested that a dog has it by necropsy (post-mortem exam).  It can not be cured or treated.  Weimaraners are not one of the common breeds that this appears with.  The onset of the symptoms are a result of purkinje cells dying off once the dog is born.  This condition can progress and become worse, but the vet said that if they live without progressive symptoms and get to be adults (1+) the likelihood that they will just live with the condition as it is is much greater.  There is not a lot of research of this condition in dogs. Regardless of which thing is causing their symptoms, adopters will need to be aware to watch for progressive symptoms, they probably should be adopted to a home that doesn’t include navigating stairs, pools, or things that are easy to bump into or fall on.  They will be able to be spay/neutered at the appropriate time, but adopters will just need to know that following anesthesia their symptoms can worsen for a short time following anesthesia.  Adopters are welcome to have their veterinarians reach out to the neurologist that has done their exams or WRT can provide reports and medical records. If you are interested in adopting one or both as a pair, please submit an application.  They are being fostered in Dallas. ##861062## show less

See details

Ricky

Weimaraner

SPECIAL NEEDS: Ricky is a 16-week-old, 36-pound, Gray Weimaraner that was surrendered to WRT due to neurological deficits at birth alon... show more

SPECIAL NEEDS: Ricky is a 16-week-old, 36-pound, Gray Weimaraner that was surrendered to WRT due to neurological deficits at birth along with his sister Lucy.  His neurological deficits are less defined than his sisters and include a head-tilt, moving in a circular fashion with a bunny-hop and sometimes he falls over. WRT has done extensive neurological testing on them and the vet thinks with the symptoms they have and the clear MRI and spinal tap that it can only be two remaining things: In utero herpes virus:  If this is the cause, then the damage is already done and they will not progress in their condition – they will just be like they are now and live a somewhat normal life with their symptoms.  This condition often produces stillborn puppies so he is leaning more to this one since there were other littermates that were stillborn.  Cerebellar abiotrophy:  This condition is an autosomal genetic recessive gene and can only be definitively tested that a dog has it by necropsy (post-mortem exam).  It can not be cured or treated.  Weimaraners are not one of the common breeds that this appears with.  The onset of the symptoms are a result of purkinje cells dying off once the dog is born.  This condition can progress and become worse, but the vet said that if they live without progressive symptoms and get to be adults (1+) the likelihood that they will just live with the condition as it is is much greater.  There is not a lot of research of this condition in dogs. Regardless of which thing is causing their symptoms, adopters will need to be aware to watch for progressive symptoms, they probably should be adopted to a home that doesn’t include navigating stairs, pools, or things that are easy to bump into or fall on.  They will be able to be spay/neutered at the appropriate time, but adopters will just need to know that following anesthesia their symptoms can worsen for a short time following anesthesia.  Adopters are welcome to have their veterinarians reach out to the neurologist that has done their exams or WRT can provide reports and medical records. If you are interested in adopting one or both as a pair, please submit an application.  They are being fostered in Dallas. ##864290## show less

See details

Stormy

Blue Lacy/Texas Lacy

SPECIAL NEEDS - PLEASE READ BEFORE APPLYING Hey there world, I’m Stormy.  I’m a 3-year-old, 50-pound, Texas Blue Lacey (yes, my foster... show more

SPECIAL NEEDS - PLEASE READ BEFORE APPLYING Hey there world, I’m Stormy.  I’m a 3-year-old, 50-pound, Texas Blue Lacey (yes, my foster mom did the DNA test).  Please make sure you read my whole profile though because I need a specific adopter because my past life before rescue was not good. When I first came into rescue in July 2019, I had been in a shelter for 6 months after having been found stray.  No one even named me at the shelter that whole time I was there.  They just told me to go in and out of my run.  When WRT came to take me, I wasn’t sure how to act.  Every time I was in a stressful situation the only way I knew how to soothe myself was to turn in circles and chase my tail and grab my back leg with my teeth.  After arriving in foster care, my foster mom thought there might be something more medically wrong with me because I wasn’t eating right so rescue started looking into possible neurological issues.  She advocated every step of the way for me.  So, we went to a neurologist who put me on seizure medication thinking that I was potentially having pre-seizures.  The medication, however, didn’t help my anxiety or lower my need to self soothe in a crazy way.  All neurological tests that they did came back negative, so we proceeded with trying to determine if the way I was acting was behavioral. That’s when I met my favorite person in the whole world.  Maegan Bardes with The Confident Pooch and my boarding guys, Alex and Ray, with Hudson’s Camp Canine.  Maegan realized that my behavior was severe OCD and she started working with me to help me learn how to be the dog everyone knew I could be.  I stayed and trained with her for 4 months until we thought it was time that I go to a foster home.  Unfortunately, my second foster home had a train that went right by the potty area and that absolutely freaked me out so I went back to stay with Maegan until a new foster could be found.  I have now been with my current foster family for a few months now, so they know pretty much what I need for a forever adoptive family. Must Haves: Patient Owner (Preferably One that Lives Alone) - A patient, gentle, soft-spoken owner, preferably one that lives alone and doesn't have very many visitors.  I need a very calm and quiet environment.  Someone that has a consistent and quiet routine and that has a very calming gentle nature.  This owner must be willing to continue to give me my anxiety medication and reinforce the training I have gotten.  If people do come to visit or someone comes to the door, I need to be crated or put outside away from people as any new introductions escalate my anxiety. Solid Wood Fence - A home with a solid fence and very few cars coming and going for me to see.    You see, you wouldn’t believe how far I’ve come in 6 months.  When kept in a calm predictable environment, I don’t spin to chase my tail or grab my leg, but when I get overly anxious it may come out occasionally.  A dog door will also be needed for me to come and go.  I love to be outside and will lay for hours soaking up the sun outside. No children - Because of my anxiety any extra stimulation gets me worked up so no kids please. Likes: I love my walks and I'm great on leash (even a grandma could walk me).  I am still slightly reactive when cars go by, so if you will have me sit as they go by I do well. I sit, stay, heel, down, and go to my place.  I love to work for treats. I’m housebroken and crate trained - although I'd love to lay beside you if you will let me. I ride in the car without barking now and would like to go for a ride to a walking trail, but out where people might want to pet me will make me anxious. I do fine when left alone.  White noise or calm soothing music is my favorite. I love to catch and drop (if you throw the ball though I will not retrieve it for you). I am fine with other dogs off leash, but this would be more for boarding than for living unless the other dog is older and really laid back and ok with my anxiety.  I'm currently living with a Weimaraner and he plays with me sometimes, but he knows when I don't want to play too. I love praise and cuddling on my own terms and morning coffee time. Dislikes: Passing cars while walking - you have to use my commands to help me remember to stay calm New people - introductions to new people must be slow and in a specific way or I will spin Loud noises - clapping your hands together sends me retreating in fear to the outdoors, slamming doors, banging pans in the kitchen, and especially lawn equipment like blowers, mowers and weed whackers.  Surprisingly though I'm not afraid of the vacuum.  I'll just watch you very closely. Vet visits - since I'm currently up to date on all my vet care I shouldn't need to see a vet for another year.  I've even had a recent dental so that I don't have to be stressed out.  Don't be surprised if the vet needs to muzzle me though because the vet is a very stressful place for me. If you can’t tell, I just need someone as special as me to help keep me calm.  I know that is out there for me to finally get my forever home.  My trainer, Maegan, will work with any adopter that adopts me in the Dallas area.  Please ask about me if you are in Dallas. ##454693## show less